Chihuahua Rescue from Hot Car, Woman Confronts Owner

The story of the Chihuahua rescue from hot car has gone viral, drawing attention to the risks of high temperatures for pets left in vehicles. Here’s how the dramatic story went.

@lifeofarlene Its crazy how cops cant do nothing about it #foryoupage #peta #lynwood #LA #dogtok #dog ♬ original sound – Kim&Chris:)

The Story of the Chihuahua Rescue

When Arlene Hernandez heard the faint sound of whimpering, she never imagined she’d soon be involved in a Chihuahua rescue from a hot car.

Outside, the temperature was a sweltering 86 degrees Fahrenheit, but inside the car, it was undoubtedly hotter. Hernandez waited by the vehicle, hoping the owner would return soon.

However, as time passed without any sign of them, she realized that immediate action was necessary.

Concerned for the dog’s wellbeing, Hernandez decided to call the police. This Chihuahua rescue from a hot car was becoming a race against time. She recounted to Newsweek how the dog, with only a fractionally opened window, had likely been trapped for about an hour.

The police, upon arrival, tried various methods to safely open the car. They attempted to unlock the doors and even reached out to animal control, which unfortunately would take another hour to arrive.

Dangers of Leaving Pets in Hot Cars

The issue of leaving pets in hot cars, like in the Chihuahua rescue from a hot car incident, brings to light several critical dangers:

Rapid Temperature Increase

It’s a common misconception that cracking a window can keep the car interior cool. However, the AVMA clarifies that even with slightly open windows, a car can quickly become an oven.

On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes.

After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. This rapid increase in temperature can be fatal for pets.

Heatstroke and Health Consequences

Pets, particularly dogs, are highly susceptible to heatstroke as they can only cool themselves by panting and through a limited number of sweat glands in their paws.

Symptoms of heatstroke in pets include excessive panting, drooling, reddened gums, vomiting, diarrhea, unsteadiness, and collapse. If not treated promptly, it can lead to severe organ dysfunction and death.

The Vulnerability of Certain Breeds

Some pets are more prone to the dangers of hot cars. Breeds with thick fur, and short noses (like bulldogs, pugs, and Persian cats), young animals, seniors, and pets with certain health conditions are at a higher risk of overheating.

Legal Consequences for Pet Owners

Many states have laws against leaving pets in hot cars. Owners can face fines, criminal charges, and even jail time. Beyond legal repercussions, there’s a moral and ethical responsibility that pet owners must consider.

Startling Statistics

The rising statistics from PETA highlight a disturbing trend. Each year, hundreds of pets die from heat-related causes, many of them trapped in cars.

These numbers don’t account for the countless near-misses, where pets are rescued just in time, like the Chihuahua rescued from a hot car.

Chihuahua rescue from hot car illustrated by the woman holding the pup
Chihuahua rescue from hot car illustrated by the woman holding the pup

Chihuahua Rescue from Hot Car: A Happy Ending

After what must have felt like an eternity, Hernandez and the police successfully rescued the Chihuahua from the hot car. The dog, though thirsty and visibly distressed, was thankfully okay after being freed.

The owner, upon returning, seemed unaware of the gravity of the situation. Despite her reservations, Hernandez returned the dog to its owner, who was accompanied by a young girl.

The story of the Chihuahua rescue from a hot car is more than just a single act of heroism. It’s a call to action for all of us to be more vigilant and proactive in ensuring the safety of our furry friends.

By learning from this incident and spreading awareness, we can work toward a future where such rescues are no longer necessary, and our pets remain safe and well-cared for.